Karenís Cloth Diapering Site

Main page | Types of cloth diapers and covers | My search for the perfect cover | A note on detergents | My repelling fleece saga | Pics of Isaac in cloth dipes | Pics of Julia in cloth dipes | My experiences with diapering a newborn | Nighttime diapering | Diapering on the go | Prefold folds | My recommendations for getting started | Step-by-step diaper change pictorial | Knitting soakers | Trimming prefolds | Homemade pockets | Other eco-friendly choices

Getting Started

If you're just getting started, I recommend that you buy 2 dozen Chinese prefolds, 6 covers, and possibly a snappi and some pins. That's enough to get you through 2-3 days between washes. For a newborn, I'd recommend infant sized prefolds (you could get preemie (2x4x2's) or newborn (4x6x4's) if you're expecting a small baby, but infants worked fine for my average sized 7.5 lb'er). For a baby of about 14 or 15 pounds, I'd recommend regular (4x6x4) prefolds, and for babies 20 lbs and up, I'd go with premiums. One of the starter packages from the websites on my main page would be ideal, especially if you ask the owner to give you a mix of covers -- say a Bummis, a Bumkins, a Prorap, a Dappi, etc. Not all covers work for all babies and this way you can try a variety. Also go to Target/Walmart/discount store of your choice, and buy a few 15 packs of cheapo washcloths. These make great wipes, and they're cheaper than anything else you can buy on-line. Later, if you want something more luxurious, you can buy them as needed. They d on't fit in wipes warmers very well, so I just wet mine in the sink.

If you decide to go with unbleached prefolds, buy some Tide. It's the only detergent I've tried that really strips the oils off of these diapers easily. Then you won't have to turn up your water heater, or boil the diapers, etc. Just wash them in very hot water with a little bit of Tide (drying between washes). When you pour water on a dry diaper and it soaks right in rather than beading up and running off, then your diapers are ready to use.

Once you've got your prefolds and covers, you can start cloth diapering full-time. Give it a few weeks and see what your likes and dislikes are. If you hate prefolds or just want something easier for outings, husbands, or babysitters, then you can try fitteds or AIO's. Just buy one at at time (maybe used) and try them out. Again, different diapers work for different babies and just because one person raves about a diaper doesn't mean it will be the perfect one for your babe. This way, you've always got the prefolds and covers to fall back on as you're trying out other things.

Also, if you start out this way, you'll spend the equivalent of about 2 months worth of disposable diapers. So just make a deal with yourself. Buy a starter kit, try it for 2 months. Then if you don't like it, you haven't lost any money. Actually, you can usually sell cloth diapering supplies for a decent percentage of what you spent, so you won't really be out any money at all.

Main page | Types of cloth diapers and covers | My search for the perfect cover | A note on detergents | My repelling fleece saga | Pics of Isaac in cloth dipes | Pics of Julia in cloth dipes | My experiences with diapering a newborn | Nighttime diapering | Diapering on the go | Prefold folds | My recommendations for getting started | Step-by-step diaper change pictorial | Knitting soakers | Trimming prefolds | Homemade pockets | Other earth-friendly choices

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This site was created on March 9, 2003.

Last updated June 13, 2006